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bana2166

bana2166

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Subject:Haitian Baseball Association Launches

Haitian Baseball Association Launches

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Tuesday, 06 December 2011 21:36

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (defend.ht) – The Haitian Baseball Association began operations November 17, 2011 inviting young Haitians to experience the popular American sport barely known on the west side of the island.

Journalists, leaders of federations and sports associations attended the launching of activities of the Haitian Baseball Association, wrote Le Nouvelliste.

Young Haitian baseballers gave demonstrations among warm applause by the spectators, the paper said.

Gardy Cyriaque Prophet, the president of the Haitian Baseball, Association has announced a whole program designed for the development of the sport first in the capital Port-au-Prince then in the countryside.

He also took the opportunity to appeal to various sectors to consolidate this initiative by providing the AHB financial and material aid (gloves, bats, helmets, balls).

Gardy Cyriaque Prophet referred to the establishment of training centers for learning the sport and developing a structure for the integration of baseball in the schools.

Haiti has never been known as a country where baseball is played. In fact, there are no current professional baseball players from Haiti. Yet a short trip over to the Dominican Republic reveals the largest number of foreign-born baseball players currently playing in the major leagues.

For decades past, Major League Baseball (MLB) relied upon Haitian workers, mostly young women earning a high of $1.70 per day, to stitch together their baseballs. Last year, MLB has pledged a donation of $1 million to benefit earthquake victims in Haiti.

http://defend.ht/sports/articles/baseball/2163-haiti-wants-to-play-baseball


Posted: 07 Dec 2011 11:40 AM
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bana2166

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Subject:Haitian Baseball Association Launches

Quote from Defend.ht .......In fact, there are no current professional baseball players from Haiti. ....


bana2166 believed Defend.ht is wrong ....there is a Oakland A's pitcher that claim to be born in Haiti ... I'm trying to find his name and Baltimore Orioles Outfielder Felix Pie claim to be born from Haiti ...






Article posted on MLB web site on January 14th, 2010 ...




Phillies prospect Reginal Simon was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Minor Leaguers born in Haiti
01/14/2010 3:28 PM ET
MiLB.com Staff

Thirteen Minor League players are currently listed as having been born in the nation of Haiti, which was hit with a catastrophic earthquake on Tuesday. Major League clubs are in the process of checking on their players' status. Below is a list of those 13 players, along with their organization and 2009 team.

P Francique Charles Phillies, DSL
2B Wilner Charles Dodgers, DSL
OF Alexis Elie Lamour Rays, DSL
OF Jacobo Espiede Parent club: N/A
P Eduard Estalis Cardinals, DSL
C Gasner Guerrier Parent club: N/A
P Samuel Jean Orioles, DSL
P Michael Joseph Marlins, DSL
3B Ketnold Noel Marlins, GCL
P Dieudone Paul Astros, DSL

UPDATE: Dieudone Paul was in the Dominican Republic with his family and was unharmed during Tuesday's 7.0-magnitude earthquake that crippled the capital city of Port-au-Prince. More >>

2B Nelson Pierre Tigers, DSL
P Reginal Simon Phillies, Williamsport
IF Franklin Toussaint Athletics, DSL


http://web.minorleaguebaseball.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20100114&content_id=7917086&vkey=news_milb&fext=.jsp


Posted: 07 Dec 2011 11:52 AM
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bana2166

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Subject:Haitian Baseball Association Launches

Calm down, Calm down, Please Calm down .............ESPN Magazine article posted March 10, 2009 ....



ESPN Magazine .....The Rise Of The Haitian-Dominican Player


Quote:
Any fan interested in how the Dominican Republic came to be the world's leading per capita producer of Major Leaguers needs to read Rob Ruck's 1991 book, "The Tropic of Baseball." Part history, part travelogue, the University of Pittsburgh professor's book holds up well nearly two decades later. And lo and behold, ESPN The Magazine's former baseball editor and current Insider chief Jon Scher is thanked in the foreword.

Now we get to return the favor. Thanks to Ruck's original insights, The Mag can now humbly advance one of his book's great stories—the genesis of the player pipeline from the city of San Pedro de Macoris.

Ruck documented the role demographics played in the "Miracle of Macoris," which has produced more than 70 big leaguers from a city of 200,000. Much of the San Pedro talent pool descended from English-speaking Caribbean islanders brought to the Dominican in the early 1900s to work in the cane fields and later, the sugar refineries.

These English speakers, known as Cocolos, worked the toughest jobs for the lowest wages. But they came to the island with a proud culture and a passion for swinging the bat—a cricket bat. Within a few generations, those sons and grandsons of Cocolos took up baseball, and took it to another level, with players like Rico Carty, George Bell, Alfredo Griffin, Nelson Norman, Pedro Guerrero, Tony Fernandez and Julio Franco setting the stage for the island's outsized MLB presence today.

In our January trip to the DR, Jorge Arangure Jr. and I noticed a new wrinkle in Ruck's historic tale: the rise of the Haitian-Dominican player.

Like the Cocolos of the early 1900s, Haitians for the past three decades have immigrated to the DR (the countries share a porous border) for work in the cane fields or whatever else they could find. While the Dominican is poor, its economy is far healthier than Haiti's. The Haitian immigrants have often been exploited, in some cases bearing conditions that human rights groups say are tantamount to slavery.

Prejudice against Haitians runs high in the DR, Ruck says, a product of history (Haiti invaded and occupied the Dominican from 1822-44) and often-racist fear mongering by past Dominican politicians.

Yet just like the Cocolos before them, a generation of Haitians has persevered, and their kids have taken up baseball. And now those kids are succeeding. We saw several talented second-generation Haitian kids on our travels through the Dominican player-development system.

"That's great," says Ruck. "I've been waiting for years for this." Why? Ruck thinks a breakout Dominican baseball star of Haitian descent can start to chip away at the wall of bigotry Haitians face.

As one former baseball prospect, who didn't want his name used, told us: "When somebody commits a crime, we're considered Haitian. When one of us has tremendous success as a ballplayer, then they consider us Dominican." On our travels, we met Gustavo Pierre, a 17-year-old shortstop in the Blue Jays organization, whose grandparents emigrated from Haiti and whose mother works as a cook in La Romana. Pierre signed for around $700,000 last year. We met Luis Jolly, a sweet-swinging outfield prospect who could draw a high six-figure bonus on signing day this July 2.

And we met Miguel Angel Sano, a shortstop with a booming bat and a laser, rocket arm who baseball people say could command $3 million when he signs this summer. Sano's mother says her son has both Haitian and Cocolo blood, and is proud of it. Sano symbolizes another chapter in how the Dominican baseball melting pot can be a pot of gold for a lucky few. And just maybe a golden opportunity to change a society.


Posted: 07 Dec 2011 12:02 PM
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bana2166

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Subject:Haitian Baseball Association Launches

former Florida Marlins & Current outfielder for Chicago WhiteSox ... Juan Pierre is not Haitian .... He is not Haitian

He was born in Alabama & Grew up in Louisiana .....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Pierre


Posted: 07 Dec 2011 12:06 PM
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johnphilippeo8

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Subject:Haitian Baseball Association Launches

NOBODY SAYS HE WAS HAITIAN BANA  MEN MISYE GENDWA SE GEN HAITIEN NAN LI  LE PLUS SOUVAN OUBYEN MISYE GENDWA SE DESANDAN TRINIDADIEN PASKE ZONE SA YO GEN PIERRES AK TOUSSAINTS   MEN MAJORITE TI MOUNN KI FE ISIT KI GEN SIYATI PIERRE SE ORIGINE HAITIENNE YO LE FINI  LOUISANA CHAJE AK HAITIEN


Posted: 07 Dec 2011 02:55 PM
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bana2166

bana2166

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Subject:Haitian Baseball Association Launches

>NOBODY SAYS HE WAS HAITIAN
>BANA  MEN MISYE GENDWA SE
>GEN HAITIEN NAN LI  LE
>PLUS SOUVAN OUBYEN MISYE
>GENDWA SE DESANDAN TRINIDADIEN
>PASKE ZONE SA YO GEN PIERRES
>AK TOUSSAINTS   MEN
>MAJORITE TI MOUNN KI FE ISIT
>KI GEN SIYATI PIERRE SE
>ORIGINE HAITIENNE YO LE
>FINI  LOUISANA CHAJE AK
>HAITIEN



http://www.heritagekonpa.com/archives/World%20series-%20Juan%20Pierre.htm

Juan Pierre OF Florida Marlins' has many Haitians embracing baseball

Nick Sortal, Sun-Sentinel

Not only does he spark the Marlins' offense, but Juan Pierre unknowingly ignited a passion for baseball among South Florida's Haitian community -- by his last name alone.

"JP is absolutely No. 1 in the Haitian community, and there is no No. 2," says Jean Marc Louissant, a financial aid administrator from Coral Springs, who like many fans, refers to Pierre as "JP." "There's a lot of pride there, and it's just based on hope alone."

Although Pierre and his family are grateful for the support, they say all they share with their Haitian fans are different dialects of Creole and two centuries ago, the same landlord: France.

The Pierre family tree has been rooted for generations in Louisiana, although Juan was born in Mobile, Ala. Soon after, his father moved the family to Alexandria, La.

Often asked if he's Haitian, Pierre politely says no.

"But if someone's rooting for me, it's all good. It means they respect my game," the center fielder says.

He joined the Marlins via a November trade with Colorado, and this year he scored 100 runs, batted .305 and led the major leagues with 65 stolen bases. As the team's fan base has grown, so has the talk of his background.

"We just assume that he's Haitian," says Louissaint's brother, Claude, of Fort Lauderdale.

More Headlines
The Trials Of Haiti
Making Strides Against Breast Cancer
Add to Our To-Do List : Finish the Job in Haiti
Corruption remains rife in many of the world's poorest countries
The Fifteenth Annual Caribbean Sunshine Awards
Empowerment through Education, Western Union
SKAH SHAH #1 "THE REUNION"
Pictures Of Haiti
Visit our archive for more stories
There's plenty of confusion, say the center fielder's parents, Derry and James Pierre, who were in town this week for the games. Some fans think the ballplayer is Dominican because his first name is "Juan." But actually, James Pierre's father's favorite player was former Giants pitcher Juan Marichal. And Derry Pierre picked the middle name of "D'Vaughn" for JP because, "it has a good rhyme to it ... `Juan D'Vaughn.'"

Says James Pierre, who arrived at Pro Player Stadium two hours before the Wednesday's game: "As long as they're cheering for him -- whoever is cheering -- that's fine with me."

Fitting in

That certainly includes the area's 184,000 Haitians counted in the 2000 census. They came from a country where factory workers, mainly women, were paid meager wages to hand-stitch American baseballs. The factory moved to Costa Rica in 1990 after about 20 years in Port-au-Prince.

Although baseball is wildly popular in Cuba and the Dominican Republic, which shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti, America's national pastime never crossed the mountains to the French side. The bats, gloves and other equipment needed to play were beyond the means of the average Haitian. Instead, soccer became the national sport.

But once moved to South Florida, Haitians have taken to baseball as a way to assimilate, says Marvin Dejean of Minority Development and Empowerment Inc., a Fort Lauderdale social service agency. Juan Pierre gives them an "in" to join their fellow South Floridians. Having someone perceived as their own has Haitians talking baseball, he says.

"We could use a hero," he says. "And it's a way of being part of this magical thing that's going on. They've adopted him whether he's Haitian or not, with that name, that's the way for them to get a piece of this and be accepted."

Two Creoles

When James Pierre talks about his family tree, some Haitians turn it into a kinship.

He explains that he's a "full-blooded" Creole. Louisianians of French and Spanish descent began referring to themselves as Creoles after the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, to distinguish themselves from newcomers moving into the territory, notes Sybil Kine, a historian at Louisiana State University.

The Pierres have spoken the Creole language for generations. Although Louisiana Creole and the Haitian Creole differ, they share a French foundation, enabling James to chat with Haitians on his South Florida visits.

That fires up Jean-Robert Lafortune, executive director of the Haitian-American Grassroots Coalition in Miami. He points to the early 1800s, when about 14,000 Haitian refugees settled in New Orleans because their country was fighting for independence from France.

"So if we go through his family tree, that tree will indicate that a great-great-great-great ancestor was from Haiti," Lafortune says.

Like most people, however, James Pierre doesn't take his family history back that far.

Knowing heritage

The Haitian/non-Haitian issue runs deeper than those from other nationalities might think, Lafortune says.

The public's misperceptions linking Haitians with voodoo and violence, as well as insecurities about Haiti being the poorest nation in the hemisphere make some Haitians deny their origins, he said, which makes him think that he and the Pierres have a common culture.

Times have changed, though, says Sony Fenelon, a patron of Bamboche, a storefront food stop in East Miramar.

"It's all different now, we've come so far," he says. "All of racism is less prevalent than it used to be."

Another Bamboche patron, Marjorie Legagneur, says public knowledge of Pierre and fans' Louisiana-Haitian connection theories are important for another reason:

"It's always good to talk about your heritage, to ask your relatives about your grandparents and the people before them," she says


Posted: 07 Dec 2011 03:38 PM
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bana2166

bana2166

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Subject:Haitian Baseball Association Launches

>NOBODY SAYS HE WAS HAITIAN
>BANA  MEN MISYE GENDWA SE
>GEN HAITIEN NAN LI  LE
>PLUS SOUVAN OUBYEN MISYE
>GENDWA SE DESANDAN TRINIDADIEN
>PASKE ZONE SA YO GEN PIERRES
>AK TOUSSAINTS   MEN
>MAJORITE TI MOUNN KI FE ISIT
>KI GEN SIYATI PIERRE SE
>ORIGINE HAITIENNE YO LE
>FINI  LOUISANA CHAJE AK
>HAITIEN


What the hell you are talking about JohnP? ....





The Pierre family tree has been rooted for generations in Louisiana, although Juan was born in Mobile, Ala. Soon after, his father moved the family to Alexandria, La.

Often asked if he's Haitian, Pierre politely says no.


http://www.heritagekonpa.com/archives/World%20series-%20Juan%20Pierre.htm


Posted: 07 Dec 2011 03:40 PM
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Anonymous
Subject:Haitian Baseball Association Launches

I don't know why we even making this a topic for discussion. We have Dominican players whose parents or grand parents were Haitians..Players like Juan Samuel, Raoul Mondesir, Louis Polonia...etc...Why we even had to go that far in the 1800 to try to connect him with Haiti when we have DR players in the minor league/major league in the past and present whose parents and grand parents are Haitians...


Posted: 09 Dec 2011 02:11 PM
Originally Posted: 09 Dec 2011 02:09 PM
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Wingman

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Subject:Haitian Baseball Association Launches

Sammy Solsa is Haitian. Sammy's fathers from Haiti and his mother is of Haitian descent on both her maternal and paternal sides.

http://www.cosasdelcibao.net/2008/06/revelan-que-padres-de-sammy-sosa-son-haitianos/


Posted: 15 Dec 2011 08:03 PM
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jeanjak

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Subject:Haitian Baseball Association Launches

and it is because he was exposed since an early age to the D.R. racism toward Haitians that he would later bleach his skin to white and even started wearing green contact lenses.

The last I heard of this situation, he reversed the procedure after so many outcries and has embraced his blackness again.

I believe in the next few years, you will see a Haitian Little League team competes in the Little League World Series.


Posted: 16 Dec 2011 07:25 AM
Originally Posted: 16 Dec 2011 07:19 AM
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Wingman

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Subject:Haitian Baseball Association Launches

Is there little league in North Miami?


Posted: 16 Dec 2011 01:23 PM
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